How Revit might change the process.

Instead of asking everybody to be as good with Revit as they might have been with AutoCAD I can see a process where there are only a few people who excel at Revit and where this allows everyone else to focus on… something other than making drawings.

What I’ve come to understand is that everyone can (and maybe should) be a generalist to some degree… and that everyone is (can or maybe should be) also an expert at something specific… I want to tap into that expertise and use it for the good of the project, the company, the industry and, perhaps most importantly, the individual.

The funny thing is that for some people their expertise will also be a generalization!

When I was interviewing at Architekton, Doug Brown was asking how it happens that he redlines the same parapet detail, for example, multiple times on a project. I think the reason, and the problem, lies in how we, as an industry, have allowed (even encouraged) everyone on the team access to every drawing. I think something here is representative of our problems in the industry… to use a tired saying, “Too many cooks spoil the broth”.

I think Revit’s greatest strength lies in how quickly it can generate drawings. I think the change that is inevitable in the industry is not too dissimilar to how the printing press changed book and magazine publication. One person who knows what they’re doing can do the work of many… provided they are timely informed of what needs to be done. I don’t consider this person to be a “Revit Drafter” anymore than I might consider an Architect who starts with a “napkin sketch” to create Architecture a draftsman.

Most people see CAD as a necessary evil and work in these applications reluctantly. Before Revit we didn’t have much of a choice. The work required just so much manual drafting. So what would it look like if we stopped focusing on drafting?

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One Response to How Revit might change the process.

  1. I can see a process where there are only a few people who excel at Revit and where this allows everyone else to focus on… something other than making drawings.
    some other narrow specialty. :-/ such as marketing 😦

    When I was interviewing at Architekton, Doug Brown was asking how it happens that he redlines the same parapet detail, for example, multiple times on a project. I think the reason, and the problem, lies in how we, as an industry, have allowed (even encouraged) everyone on the team access to every drawing.
    and whoever unredlines the detail (multiple times) doesn’t know where the redlines are coming from??

    “Too many cooks spoil the broth”
    [i think i should read your blog entries in chrono order… then i’ll stop feeling like a reverse clairvoyant… ]
    but really, you’ve gotta keep the chefs out of the broth!

    I think Revit’s greatest strength lies in how quickly it can generate drawings. …. So what would it look like if we stopped focusing on drafting?
    “hey you! go make more presentation materials!”

    marketing uber allles!
    “You will jog for the master race
    And always wear the happy face”

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