Geek: Definition

May 30, 2008

Found this awhile back at gapingvoid.com. I think it helps make it okay to be a geek. I think it suggests that it’s essential that you be a geek about something.

“My definition of a geek is, “Somebody who socializes via objects.”

When you think about it, we’re all geeks. We’re all enthusiastic about something outside ourselves. For me, it’s marketing and cartooning. For others, it could be cellphones or Scotch Whisky or Apple computers or NASCAR or the Boston Red Sox or Bhuddism. All these act as Social Objects within a social network of people who care passionately about the stuff.

Whatever industry you are in, there’s somebody who is geeked out about your product category. They are using your product [or a competitor’s product] as a Social Object.

If you don’t understand how the geeks are socializing- connecting to other people- via your product, then you don’t actually have a marketing plan. Heck, you probably don’t have a viable business plan.”

It’s okay, go geek out on something. You’ll like it!


Medicority

May 29, 2008

About a year ago I found a program for building performance analysis, Ecotect, and its sister website/wiki devoted to training and learning. Complicated program, at least for my ignorant dumb ass, but the wiki is great. My favorite part? The organization of the training based on a series of Levels of Achievements.

Beginning with simple viewing and navigating the application at level 1 and going all the way up to being innovative in the use of the program (essentially untrainable), the Level of Achievements they’ve implemented covers a lot of ground and gives clear signs to know where you are and how to get to where you want to go.

So what if we applied that same thinking to training Revit? Here’s what I came up with:

Level 1 – View

Sufficient skill level for Partners and non-technical Project Managers.

At this level you should be able to move around and through the model in order to acquire and print the information you need without going through another person.

This level focuses on View Tab in the Design Bar.

Specific skills include being able to; navigate through the Project Browser, create additional views to show you what you want (including Visibility Graphics and View Properties settings), and print views and sheets.

Level 2 – Assist

What first time users, resistant AutoCAD geeks, SketchUp kings, interns and more than a few designers I know need to be capable of.

At level 2 you should be able to help others on the project modify existing model content and add annotations. New object creation should be limited to what is specifically “redlined” and previously discussed with Producers and/or Managers. You should also be able to create sheets and place views and have a an understanding of how to create basic schedules.

This level focuses on Drafting and Room and Area Tabs in the Design Bar.

Level 3 – Produce

This is where the majority of work is done and, as such, Project Architects and some Managers may need to be at this level.

At this point you should be creating and modifing projects with all required model components as well as know how to create basic families in either 3D or 2D and create and edit more complex Schedules.

Level 4 – Manage

Here, the power users, the Revit geeks, the computer savvy Project Architects and those highly skilled in AutoCAD making the transition may soon find themselves.

Skills at this level include; creating and managing Design Options and Phasing, creating and managing parametric families that are both 3D and 2D with appropriate levels of detail, understanding the differences between modeling for Design Intent and Construction and how to move from one to the other during the design process, as well as being able to create and edit interrelated Schedules and Schedule Keys.

Level 5 – Innovate

Who knows. How do you define or describe innovation? I think you’ll know it when you see it.

So the question I want to pose is how far down (or up if you prefer) this list do you think is far enough?

I haven’t thought about how this would apply to AutoCAD though I’m confident that, while the specifics would change, the underlying structure and rationalization would stay the same. Nearly everyone I’ve ever worked with is a Level 3 and there are always technical problems that those of us who are Level 4s (and occasionally 5s) have to spend an inordinate amount of time to correct and resolve.

That’s not good enough. Not by a long shot.

Perhaps it would help to explain if I pointed out that the steps between these levels is not geometric, it’s exponential. Each step up the ladder is at least twice as complicated, requires at least twice as much effort and at least twice as much commitment than the one before. Getting to that Level 4 or 5 is not easy. Most people give up when they’ve got enough knowledge and skills to get the job done – about Level 3.

Level 3 is mediocre, average. Level 3 is a “C”. Not good enough.

When we first started using AutoCAD, it was an asset. We used it intelligently where it made sense and only the geeks took control of the computer. Now AutoCAD is a liability. The senior staff who were trained and practiced in creating documents by hand are constantly amazed at how long it takes to get drawings created and modified compared with what it took them when they were responsible for making the drawings.

We have a chance to learn from our mistakes with AuotCAD and keep Revit from turning into a liability. The first step is having the right people, the Level 4 and 5s, working the program. We have to keep mediocrity out of the process. The 4s and 5s cannot spend half their time fixing mistakes based on ignorance. Let the 4s and 5s go as far and as fast as they’re able. Keep them in the design process and feed them what they need to make things happen in Revit.

Let the 3s and 4s focus on something else that will benefit the project, the company, the industry and themselves. Let them focus on their own 4s and 5s instead of settling for a 3.

Everyone can be remarkable. Nobody has to settle for mediocrity.